My Booklist

Fiction

  • Because of Winn Dixie

    Because of Winn Dixie

    by Kate DiCamillo Year Published: Challenging
    Through the love she gains from her new pet, a girl gains the courage to ask her father about the mother who abandoned them. In DiCamillo's first novel, each chapter possesses an arc of its own and reads almost like a short story in its completeness. Ages 8-up.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • BFG

    BFG

    by Roald Dahl Year Published: Average
    Young Sophie lies awake in her orphanage at the Witching Hour! She can't sleep and strange, macabre thoughts go through her head. The real fun begins, however, when she creeps to her window and sees a giant figure poking about in the 2nd floor windows across the street! My gosh, it's a GIANT!! The real fun begins when he kidnaps her from her bed and runs off to the land of giants.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Magic Tree House: Revolutionary War on Wednesday

    Magic Tree House: Revolutionary War on Wednesday

    by Mary Pope Osborne Year Published: Average
    If it's Wednesday, it must be Revolutionary War day. Jack and Annie, stars of the Magic Tree House series, are in for another adventure in their time- and space-traveling tree house. Mysterious magical librarian Morgan le Fay has set four new tasks for the siblings. Jack and Annie must find four special kinds of writing for Morgan's library in order to save Camelot, the ancient kingdom of King Arthur. In Civil War on Sunday, the pair traveled back to the 1860s to collect a list of rules ("something to follow") from famous nurse Clara Barton. Now they discover they must visit another war era: the Revolutionary War. Jack and Annie set aside their apprehension and soon they're spinning back through time to Christmas Day, 1776, on the banks of the Delaware River in Pennsylvania, where they encounter none other than the man on the dollar bill himself, George Washington! The children accidentally-on-purpose end up embroiled in the famous commander-in-chief's mission, where they not only play a part in convincing Washington to carry on with his patriotic duty, but also find the second kind of writing for Morgan's library: "something to send."

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • Poetry for Young People: William Shakespeare

    Poetry for Young People: William Shakespeare

    by David Scott Kasten (Editor) Year Published: Challenging
    He was the greatest poet and playwright who ever lived, the dramatist who penned lines that we quote without even realising their origin. Shakespeare's glorious works have even inspired animated films - like Disney's "The Lion King". Introduce children to the Bard with this wonderful, fully annotated collection of sonnets and soliloquies, enhanced with beautiful, highly realistic colour paintings that bring each excerpt to vivid life. Here are Shakespeare's most famous speeches: including everything from "Hamlets" - 'To be or not to be' - and "Macbeth's" witches cackling 'Double, double, toil and trouble' to the sonnets, "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" and humourous songs sung in comedies such as "Twelfth Night". Every entry is a revelation.
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  • Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims: Time-Travel Ad

    Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims: Time-Travel Adventures with Exceptional Americans

    by Rush Limbaugh Year Published: Challenging
    Nationally syndicated radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh created the character of a fearless middle-school history teacher named Rush Revere, who travels back in time and experiences American history as it happens, in adventures with exceptional Americans. In this book, he is transported back to the deck of the Mayflower. The main characters, Rush Revere, and his horse Liberty travel back in time and use a Smartphone to capture live videos of historical events, which they show their students as they happen. Included in the book are maps, photos and illustrations to help you figure out where the characters are and what they're up to.
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  • Rush Revere and the First Patriots

    Rush Revere and the First Patriots

    by Rush Limbaugh Year Published: Challenging
    In this sequel to Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims (2013), colonial-dressing history teacher Rush Revere and his special horse Liberty time travel with students Tommy, Freedom, Cameron (Cam), and even snooty Elizabeth back to pre-American Revolution days. The story is both educational and entertaining! Laugh-out-loud funny at times! They talk to Benjamin Franklin in 1765 when he tried to convince the English Parliament to remove the Stamp Act. They meet Patrick Henry that same year in Virginia prior to his famous 1775 speech to the House of Burgesses. They have an audience in Windsor Palace with King George III in 1766. They visit with Samuel Adams and Paul Revere in Boston, MA, following the “Boston Massacre” in 1770 and participate in the famous Boston Tea Party. They even get to speak with John Adams and George Washington at the First Continental Congress in 1774 at Philadelphia, PA. There is a lot of interesting insight into the personalities of these important figures of American history.
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  • The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

    The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

    by Kate DiCamillo Year Published: Average
    Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a china rabbit named Edward Tulane. The rabbit was very pleased with himself, and for good reason: he was owned by a girl named Abilene, who adored him completely. And then, one day, he was lost... Kate DiCamillo takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the depths of the ocean to the net of a fisherman, from the bedside of an ailing child to the bustling streets of Memphis. Along the way, we are shown a miracle--that even a heart of the most breakable kind can learn to love, to lose, and to love again

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The One and Only Ivan

    The One and Only Ivan

    by Katherine Applegate Year Published: Average
    Having spent twenty-seven years behind the glass walls of his enclosure in a shopping mall, Ivan has grown accustomed to humans watching him. He hardly ever thinks about his life in the jungle. Instead, Ivan occupies himself with television, his friends Stella and Bob, and painting. But when he meets Ruby, a baby elephant taken from the wild, he is forced to see their home, and his art, through new eyes. In the tradition of timeless stories like Charlotte's Web and Stuart Little, Katherine Applegate blends humor and poignancy to create an unforgettable story of friendship, art, and hope.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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  • The Tale of Despereaux

    The Tale of Despereaux

    by Kate DiCamillo Year Published: Challenging
    The lives of Despereaux, a rat, a serving girl, and a princess intertwine into a delicious adventure that will have you turning the pages as fast as you can read. Full of clever plot twists and beautiful prose "The Tale of Despereaux" is not to be missed.

    Note: This book is available in our Library.
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Non Fiction

  • America: A Patriotic Primer

    America: A Patriotic Primer

    by Lynne Cheney Year Published: Easy Reading
    Written by Lynne Cheney, author and wife of Vice President Richard Cheney, to honor this "beautiful land made more beautiful still by our commitment to freedom," America: A Patriotic Primer is a proud celebration of the individuals, milestones, and principles of this nation. Each spread features elaborately decorated letters of the alphabet, with one or two kids draped over its bars and loops, along with the highlighted concept or person. "J is for Jefferson," for example, is bordered with biographical details and quotations from Thomas Jefferson, while mini images depict the third president's famous home (Monticello), some of his inventions, and a description of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom.
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  • Chasing Lincoln's Killer

    Chasing Lincoln's Killer

    by James L. Swanson Year Published: Challenging
    Devoted to the South, John Wilkes Booth had planned to kidnap Lincoln and hold him hostage, but when that plan did not materialize, he hatched his assassination plot. Co-conspirators in Washington, Maryland, and Virginia helped him escape and evade capture for 12 days before being surrounded in a barn and killed. Readers will be engrossed by the almost hour-by-hour search and by the many people who encountered the killer as he tried to escape. It is a tale of intrigue and an engrossing mystery.
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  • Magic Tree House: American Revolution Fact Checker

    Magic Tree House: American Revolution Fact Checker

    by Mary Pope Osborne & Natalie Pope Boyce Year Published: Average
    When Jack and Annie got back from their adventure in Magic Tree House #22: Revolutionary War on Wednesday, they had lots of questions. What was it like to live in colonial times? Why did the stamp Act make the colonists so angry? Who were the Minutemen? What happened at the Boston Tea Party? Find out the answers to these questions and more as Jack and Annie track the facts. Filled with up-to-date information, photos, illustrations, and fun tidbits from Jack and Annie, the Magic Tree House Fact Trackers are the perfect way for kids to find out more about the topics they discovered in their favorite Magic Tree House adventures.
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  • New York City History for Kids: From New Amsterdam

    New York City History for Kids: From New Amsterdam to the Big Apple with 21 Activities

    by Richard Panchyk Year Published: Average
    In this lively 400-year history, kids will read about Peter Stuyvesant and the enterprising Dutch colonists, follow the spirited patriots as they rebel against the British during the American Revolution, learn about the crimes of the infamous Tweed Ring, journey through the notorious Five Points slum with its tenements and street vendors, and soar to new heights with the Empire State Building and New York City’s other amazing skyscrapers. Along the way, they’ll stop at Central Park, the Brooklyn Bridge, the Statue of Liberty, and many other prominent New York landmarks. With informative and fun activities, such as painting a Dutch fireplace tile or playing a game of stickball, this valuable resource includes a time line of significant events, a list of historic sites to visit or explore online, and web resources for further study, helping young learners gain a better understanding of the Big Apple’s culture, politics, and geography.
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  • The American Revolution for Kids

    The American Revolution for Kids

    by Janis Herbert Year Published: Average
    Heroes, traitors, and great thinkers come to life in this activity book, and the concepts of freedom and democracy are celebrated in true accounts of the distinguished officers, wise delegates, rugged riflemen, and hardworking farm wives and children who created the new nation. This collection tells the story of the Revolution, from the hated Stamp Act and the Boston Tea Party to the British surrender at Yorktown and the creation of the United States Constitution. All American students are required to study the Revolution and the Constitution, and these 21 activities make it fun and memorable. Kids create a fringed hunting shirt and a tricorner hat and reenact the Battle of Cowpens. They will learn how to make their voices heard in “I Protest” and how Congress works in “There Ought to Be a Law.” A final selection including the Declaration of Independence, a glossary, biographies, and pertinent Web sites makes this book a valuable resource.
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  • We the People: The Story of the Constitution

    We the People: The Story of the Constitution

    by Lynne Cheney Year Published: Easy Reading
    Students in grades 3–5 will love this clear, cogent prose, Cheney lays out the tumultuous situation of the country at the end of the Revolutionary War. She moves on to the gathering of the representatives at the convention and colorfully describes the various issues and arguments that had to be resolved before the Constitution could be written. The vocabulary is rich, and the author incorporates fascinating details about the personalities who undertook this monumental task.
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